Digitize Services

Convert Your Media To Digital

Digitize photos and videos to access them on the cloud, via flash drive, or on a DVD! Please select the media you would like to convert below to purchase online, or schedule a time to meet us in person!

AdobeStock 205282067

Tapes

Do you have old VHS, Betamax, or Hi8 tapes that you haven't seen in years? We can help you reconnect with those memories once again with our tape to digital services. Pick your media and add to cart to order online!

1977: The VHS videocassette format is introduced in North America at a press conference before the Consumer Electronics Show starts in Chicago. Long before the battle between Blu-ray and HD-DVD, there was another home-video standards war that pitted Sony against another Japanese company, JVC. It was VHS vs. Betamax.

1982: VHS-C is the compact VHS videocassette format, introduced by Victor Company of Japan (JVC) in 1982, and used primarily for consumer-grade compact analog recording camcorders.

1975: Betamax (also known as Beta, as in its logo) is a consumer-level analog recording and cassette format of magnetic tape for video, commonly known as a video cassette recorder. It was developed by Sony and was released in Japan on May 10, 1975, followed by the US in November of the same year.

1989: Sony’s Hi8 tape format was one of the final iterations in the evolution of analog videotape formats that began 60 years ago with massive, two-inch wide, reel-to-reel broadcast videotapes. Hi8 uses 8 mm tape – less than a third of an inch wide – housed in a compact cassette.

 1999: Digital8 (or Di8) is a consumer digital recording videocassette for camcorders based on the 8 mm video format developed by Sony. The Digital8 format is a combination of the earlier analog Hi8 tape transport with the digital DV codec

 1989: Sony’s Hi8 tape format was one of the final iterations in the evolution of analog videotape formats that began 60 years ago with massive, two-inch wide, reel-to-reel broadcast videotapes. Hi8 uses 8 mm tape – less than a third of an inch wide – housed in a compact cassette.

Reels

We can convert your 8MM, 16MM, Super8 and more to digital format so you can see your videos once again! Pick your media and add to cart to order online!

1923: 16mm film was introduced in 1923 by Eastman Kodak as a less expensive alternative to 35mm. Generally used for non-theatrical filmmaking and low-budget features, it was also very popular with amateur home-movie makers, alongside Super 8 film.

1932: Standard 8 mm film stock consists of 16 mm film reperforated to have twice the usual number of perforations along its edges, though using the same size sprocket holes.

 

1965: Super 8 mm film is a motion-picture film format released by Eastman Kodak as an improvement over the older “Double” or “Regular” 8 mm home movie format.

 

Photos

Transfer your prints, negatives, slides, and old prints to digital format and have your memories last a lifetime.

1935: For 35 mm slide film, it’s been in existence for more than 85 years. That’s right, two years after The Great Depression the 35 mm slide was invented in 1935 (a fitting name for a fitting year). As a result, it became the new standard for image projection, especially within the education system.

1935: Photographic film is a strip or sheet of transparent film base coated on one side with a gelatin emulsion containing microscopically small light-sensitive silver halide crystals. The sizes and other characteristics of the crystals determine the sensitivity, contrast, and resolution of the film.

 The first partially successful photograph of a camera image was made in approximately 1816 by Nicéphore Niépce, using a very small camera of his own making and a piece of paper coated with silver chloride, which darkened where it was exposed to light.

Contact us